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Michael Hutchins, Ph.D.

Dr. Michael Hutchins currently serves as Partner/Director of Conservation and Science for World Safaris/Safari Professionals, two of the world’s best wildlife tourism companies taking travelers into Africa and beyond. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1984 where he studied the behavioral ecology of an introduced population of Rocky Mountain goats in Olympic National Park. Dr.Hutchins has traveled to over 30 countries and six continents to pursue his passion for wildlife and nature conservation. 

Dr. Hutchins is a visionary scientist and administrator, who has a proven track record with membership-based non-profit organizations, having served as Curatorial Intern in Mammalogy, Conservation Biologist and Coordinator of Research at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo (http://www.wcs.org/) for five years (1985-1990), Director/William Conway Endowed Chair, Department of Conservation and Science at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (http://www.aza.org) for 15 years (1990-2005) and Executive Director/CEO at The Wildlife Society (http://www.wildlife.org) for seven years (2005-2012). He is a modern manager who clearly lays out expectations for his staff and then gets out of their way, so they can complete their assigned tasks, only intervening when and if there is a problem. 

Dr. Hutchins is an experienced educator, mentor and author. As Acting Assistant Professor at the University of Washington, he taught undergraduate and graduate courses in animal behavior and behavioral ecology. He has authored over 220 articles and books, covering various topics in wildlife science, management and conservation. He is consulting editor for Zoo Biology and International Zoo Yearbook, former primary editor of Smithsonian Institution Press’ book series titled "Studies in Zoo and Aquarium Biology and Conservation" and Editor Emeritus for Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia, a popular 18-volume compendium covering the entire animal kingdom.

Specialties:Behavioral ecology
Conservation biology
Wildlife management
Bioethics
Non-profit administration
Editing and publishing
Public relations
Science and policy

Partner/Director, Conservation and Science

World Safaris
2013 – Present (less than a year)Silver Spring, MD

Dr. Hutchins was recently named Partner and Director of Conservation and Science for World Safaris, a new company co-owned with Tom LaRock and affiliated with Safari Professionals, but with a focus on providing more affordable wildlife-related travel to a wider variety of destinations throughout the world. Destinations include the Galapagos Islands, Australia, Africa, Panama, Costa Rica and others. World Safaris’ primary markets will include accredited zoos and aquariums, natural history and science museums and colleges and universities. The company’s mission and tagline is “Conservation through responsible travel.” Ten percent of World Safaris’ net revenue will be donated to carefully selected conservation and related scientific and educational projects. Travelers will also be given the opportunity to make donations. Decisions regarding which projects to support will be made by a panel of experts through World Safaris’ ImpactOnWildlife Program. This program will complement Safari Professional’s ImpactOnAfrica Program. Current members of the panel include Drs. Hutchins, Betsy Dresser and Terry Maple, and Tom LaRock. World Safaris will debut at the 2013 AZA Annual Conference in Kansas City, MO from September 9-12, 2013.

World Safaris Logo

World Safaris Logo

Director, Conservation and Science

Tom LaRock's Safari Professionals
2012 – Present (1 year)

Dr. Hutchins manages Safari Professional's (http://www.safariprofessionals.com/) Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SafariProfessionals?fref=ts), takes tour groups into the Ngorongoro Crater, Serengeti and other locations in east and southern Africa, and assists in identifying conservation and associated research and educational projects deserving of the company's support (a portion of the company's proceeds are set aside for this purpose). He also engages in strategic planning with the owner and has experience traveling to several countries in Africa, including Botswana, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Photo of a male lion, Serengeti, 2011 by M. Hutchins

Photo of a male lion, Serengeti, 2011 by M. Hutchins

George Mason University

Affiliate Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy

George Mason University
April 2009 – Present (4 years 5 months)

Lecture occasionally, interact with students

Member, Editorial Board

International Zoo Yearbook/Zoological Society of London
2008 – Present (5 years)

Review manuscripts covering a wide range of wildlife research conducted in the world's professionally-managed zoological parks and aquariums.

Cover, International Zoo Yearbook, Zoological Society of London

Cover, International Zoo Yearbook, Zoological Society of London

Associate Editor

Zoo Biology
1987 – Present (26 years)

Review manuscripts for Zoo Biology, the premier peer-reviewed global journal focused on wildlife research in professionally-managed zoological parks and aquariums. Meet occasionally with other editorial advisory broad members to discuss progress and policy.

Cover, Zoo Biology, Wiley-Blackwell Publisher

Cover, Zoo Biology, Wiley-Blackwell Publisher

Wildlife Photographer

ZooThink, Inc.
1979 – Present (34 years)Worldwide

Accomplished wildlife and nature photographer, now using Canon high-resolution digital equipment. Published photographs in numerous magazines and books, including Natural History, Animals, Anima (Japan), Revista Geographica (South America), Animal Kingdom, AZA Communique, The Living Bird, Australian Geographic, Pacific Discovery,The Wildlife Professional, David P. Barash's Sociobiology and Behavior, 2nd edition and Eric Bolen and William Robinson's Wildlife Ecology and Management. A professional affiliate of the International League of Conservation Photographers (http://www.ilcp.com/affiliates/michael-hutchins#).

Photo of a giant swallowtail by M. Hutchins

Photo of a giant swallowtail by M. Hutchins

Consultant

Green Schools Alliance
2012 – 2013 (1 year)

Assisted with GSA fund-raising by providing possible sources of support. GSA currently has a membership of 7,000 K-12 schools in 15 countries worldwide and is working to reduce their carbon footprints, cut waste and connect children to nature (http://www.greenschoolsalliance.org/). Co-authored a successful grant application to Bloomberg Philanthropies that resulted in a $500,000 award to help professionalize the organization. Managed GSA's Facebook page until April 20, 2013, growing the number of friends from 700 to nearly 1,700 in a three-month period.

Cover, sucessful $500,000 grant awarded to GSA from Bloomberg Philanthropies

Cover, sucessful $500,000 grant awarded to GSA from Bloomberg Philanthropies

National Geographic Society

Correspondent, Online Newswatch Interviews

National Geographic Society
2012 – 2013 (1 year)Washington, DC

Dr. Hutchins was featured in a series of online interviews on various cutting edge topics in wildlife management and conservation by Jordan Carlton Schaul for National Geographic Newswatch. Topics included the future of zoos, zoo elephant management, the Nature Deficit Disorder, human-wildlife conflict, invasive species, emerging diseases, and endangered species. A compilation can be found at: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/tag/michael-hutchins/.

PADI

Certified Open Water SCUBA Diver

PADI
1985 – 2013 (28 years)Cairns, Queensland, Australia

Certified by PADI as an open water SCUBA diver in 1985 after completing a course and exam, working in the pool and being tested in open water on the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Dr. Hutchinshas since dived and snorkeled (including night dives and snorkels) on the Great Barrier Reef on many occasions (Heron Island, Whitsunday Islands, Lady Musgrave Island, etc.), Florida, St. Johns in the American Virgin Islands, Costa Rica, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea.

M. Hutchins photographing anenome fish on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, 1985

M. Hutchins photographing anenome fish on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, 1985

Book and Article Manuscript Reviewer

Miscellaneous
1985 – 2013 (28 years)

In addition to his extensive editorial review work with Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Smithsonian Institution Press, Johns Hopkins University Press, International Zoo Yearbook, Zoo Biology, Animal Kingdom and The Wildlife Professional, Dr. Hutchins has reviewed and commented on technical articles and book manuscripts for a variety of different publishers including: Science, Conservation Biology, Animal Behaviour, American Journal of Primatology, Animal Conservation, Anthrozoos, International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems, BioScience, Yale University Press, University of California Press and National Geographic. 

Dr. Hutchins' quotes are on the jacket covers of the following books: Lindburg, D. and Baragona, K.(eds.) 2004. Giant Panda: Biology and Conservation. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press; Gingrich, N. and Maple, T. (2007. A Contract with the Earth. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press; Asa, C. and Porton, I. (eds.) 2005. Wildlife Contraception: Issues, Methods and Applications. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press; Naugle, D.E. (ed.) 2011. Energy Development and Wildlife Conservation in Western North America. Washington, DC: Islands Press; and Conway, W.G., Hutchins, M., Souza, M., and Kapetanakos, Y. (eds.) 2001. AZA Field Conservation Resource Guide. Bethesda, MD: American Zoo and Aquarium Association.

Indianapolis Zoological Society

Member, Nominating Committee, Indianapolis Prize

Indianapolis Zoological Society
2012 – 2012 (less than a year)

Dr. Hutchins served on the nominating committee for the 2012 Indianapolis Prize, one of the most prestigious competitive awards for lifetime contributions to wildlife conservation, offering $250,000. (http://indianapolisprize.org/SitePages/AboutThePrize/NominatingCommittee2010.aspx).

Chair and Member of the Steering Committee

Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration
2006 – 2012 (6 years)Silver Spring, MD

Dr. Hutchins helped to develop a coalition of zoological parks, conservation organizations and government agencies intended to better understand and address the growing problem of human-wildlife conflict around the world (http://humanwildlifeconflict.org/). The Wildlife Society, when Dr. Hutchins was Executive Director/CEO, served as a host organization for HWCC and all of HWCC's accounting and finances were managed under TWS' 501 c(3), non-profit status. Recently, HWCC developed a global training workshop for wildlife conservation practitioners on methods used to understand and address human-wildlife conflict, including techniques used by experts to manage human-human conflict (http://humanwildlifeconflict.org/Training.htm). Currently serving as a member of the Advisory Committee.

The Wildlife Society

Executive Director/CEO

The Wildlife Society
September 2005 – August 2012 (7 years)

Dr. Hutchins served as Executive Director/CEO of The Wildlife Society, the premier scientific society for wildlife professionals (http://www.wildlife.org). The Society’s governing Council charged him with ensuring that the Society:(1) functioned as a global clearinghouse for the dissemination and utilization of knowledge about wildlife science, management and conservation; (2) exercised leadership on the North American continent in critical problem areas for wildlife and habitat management; and (3) delivered extraordinary support to wildlife managers and scientists, policy decision-makers, academics and students. As the CEO, he was responsible for goal setting, strategic planning, personnel management, fund-raising and finance. He coordinated and facilitated an extensive network of volunteer-members, organized into eight sections, 53 chapters, 105 student chapters and 19 technical working groups. During his tenure, TWS membership grew from 7,500 to 11,000; revenue increased 40%, even during an economic downturn; all TWS publications and the web site were re-branded and improved, a social media strategy initiated, and new publishing partnerships established (with Wiley-Blackwell for journals and Johns Hopkins University Press for books);a professional development program for Native American students was established as well as a Diversity Working Group, a Leadership Institute, an online mentoring program linking students and professionals; and a new award-winning member magazine, The Wildlife Professional was launched. Dr. Hutchins served as the primary media contact for TWS, helped develop press releases and was interviewed and quoted by dozens of newspaper and magazine reporters. In addition, he was involved in all policy activities, including meeting with key decision makers, reviewing correspondence going to government officials, giving testimony to Congressional committees, and developing cooperative relationships with state and federal natural resource agencies.

M. Hutchins at Aldo Leopold's Shack in Baraboo, WI made famous by A Sand County Almanac.

M. Hutchins at Aldo Leopold's Shack in Baraboo, WI made famous by A Sand County Almanac.

Board Member

Coalition of Natural Resource Societies
2005 – 2012 (7 years)Bethesda, MD

Dr. Hutchins served on the board of directors of the Coalition of Natural Resource Societies (CNRS), which included the executive directors of The Wildlife Society, Society of American Foresters and the American Fisheries Society and their policy program directors. In this capacity, he helped develop the mission of the CNRS, which was to promote cooperation between the three societies on issues related to natural resource management and conservation, to share knowledge and resources, when feasible, and to engage in cooperative projects, such as workshops and joint letters to key decision makers in Washington, DC.

Coalition of Natural Resource Societies logo.

Coalition of Natural Resource Societies logo.

The Wildlife Society

Instructor, TWS Leadership Institute

The Wildlife Society
2005 – 2012 (7 years)Various

Gave lectures on leadership at the annual TWS Leadership Institute (LI) course held in conjunction with the TWS Annual Conference. The LI focused on providing basic leadership skills training for 10-15 young professionals annually. This same lecture was given to other groups upon request, including students from Virginia Tech University, the Emerging Conservation Leader's Program (http://wildlifeleaders.org/) and others.

Co-organizer, CNRS Natural Resource Education and Employment Conference

Coalition of Natural Resource Societies
2011 – 2011 (less than a year)Denver, CO

Co-organized, co-moderated and obtained funding for a CNRS Natural Resource Education and Employment Conference in Denver, CO from September 11-13, 2011. Attended by 38 experts from academia, forestry, wildlife and habitat management and conservation, range management and fisheries, this meeting explored methods used to train current and future natural resource professionals. Similar to the TWS Blue Ribbon Panel (see below), but focused on a wider range of natural resource professions, the participants examined trends impacting the natural resource fields and their potential implications for how we train future natural resource professionals. Helped to edit the 10-page summary report and recommendations (http://joomla.wildlife.org/documents/cnrs.report.pdf), which was widely distributed to various stakeholders.

Cover, CNRS Conference Summary Report

Cover, CNRS Conference Summary Report

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Co-organizer and Participant, The Biological Resources Discipline Independent Evaluation Panel

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
2011 – 2011 (less than a year)Reston, VA

Co-organized and participated in an independent evaluation of the entire USGS Biological Research Discipline. Funded by a grant from USGS to the Ecological Society of America (ESA), The Wildlife Society and the DC-based Meridian Institute, the independent expert panel, chaired by former Director of the U.S. Forest Service, Jack Ward Thomas, conducted a detailed study of the current state of the USGS' Biological Research Division, which included reviewing strategic plans and interviewing former and current USGS employees and client agencies, such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Helped to write and edit the final report and recommendations (http://biology.usgs.gov/documents/BRDProgrammaticEvaluationFinalReport.pdf).

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Co-organizer, USGS National Partner's Dialogue

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
2011 – 2011 (less than a year)Arlington, VA

Co-organized and co-hosted a National Partner's Dialogue, a multi-stakeholder consultation on the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and DOI Climate Science Centers at the request of USGS. Funded by a USGS grant to the Ecological Society of America (ESA), Dr. Hutchins (then Executive Director/CEO of The Wildlife Society) co-organized and hosted a meeting, along with Cliff Duke of ESA, of around 40 selected expert participants from across the U.S. in Arlington, VA from November 30-1 December 2011. The intent of the meeting was to assess stakeholder perceptions of the progress of USGS and the Department of the Interior (DOI) on the establishment of its climate change science centers and the foundational concept behind them. Dr. Hutchins also helped to write and edit the 24-page (including appendices) summary report (https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/sites/default/files/documents/other/NPD%20Report%20FINAL.pdf), which was widely distributed within USGS and DOI and to participants and other relevant stakeholders.

The Wildlife Society

Invited Plenary Speaker, 2011 TWS Annual Conference

The Wildlife Society
2011 – 2011 (less than a year)Waikoloa, Hawaii

As an invited plenary speaker at the 2011 TWS Annual Conference in Waikoloa, Hawaii, Dr. Hutchins' presentation was titled "The Wildlife Society: Past, Present and Future." He spoke along with several distinguished panelists, including Simon Roosevelt (grandson of President Theodore Roosevelt) and Catherine Semcer (Sierra Club's Washington, DC Representative).

Invited Participant, Leader's Forum on Climate Change Adaptation

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
2010 – 2011 (1 year)National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV

Attended several meetings at the National Conservation Training Center with other invited experts intended to formulate the concept of a National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy (http://www.wildlifeadaptationstrategy.gov/). Participated in discussions. Helped to formulate the foundational document for the national strategy along with USFWS Director, Dan Ashe. At the request of USFWS, organized and moderated three learning sessions at the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference, Annual Conference of the Society for Conservation Biology and the TWS Annual Conference to obtain feedback on the plan.

The Wildlife Society

Co-Developer, Native American Professional Development Program

The Wildlife Society
2006 – 2011 (5 years)Bethesda, MD

Co-developed and raised funds for a successful professional development program for Native American students pursuing a career in wildlife management and conservation or related natural resource fields (http://www.wildlife.org/professional-development/grants). Worked with co-organizers Nate Svoboda and Heather Stricker to organize and promote the program and to raise funds to support it. The competitive program brought 10-15 selected students to The Wildlife Society's Annual Conference each year to engage in meetings and workshops and to attend TWS Native People's Wildlife Management Working Group seminars and other presentations. Participants also met and got to know TWS leadership. The program was featured in an article in The Wildlife Professional by Katherine Unger titled "Engaging Native American students: A TWS professional development program fosters diversity" (vol. 4(4): 46-47, 2010). During his tenure, Dr. Hutchins raised over $100,000 to support this program, primarily from government agencies, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey, USDA Forest Service, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, and others. The program was awarded the TWS 2011 Diversity Award (http://www.wildlife.org/who-we-are/awards/2011-award-winners).

Native American wildlife student.

Native American wildlife student.

Executive Director

ZooThink, Inc.
2005 – 2011 (6 years)

Served as Executive Director of ZooThink, Inc., a Maryland-based consulting company serving zoos, natural history museums and government wildlife agencies. Helped to solve complex problems in wildlife conservation, animal exhibit design and husbandry, research and education. Clients included Smithsonian's National Zoo, Houston Zoo, and the Iowa Great Ape Trust. One ZooThink consulting project resulted in the new state-of-the-art elephant exhibit at Smithsonian's National Zoo: (http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/AsianElephants/ElephantTrails.cfm).

ZooThink logo.

ZooThink logo.

Series Editor and Editor Emeritus

Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia
2001 – 2011 (10 years)

Organized, reformatted, edited, and wrote the forward for the second edition of Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, consisting of 18 volumes covering the entire animal kingdom in collaboration with dozens of topic editors and hundreds of expert authors (http://www.gale.cengage.com/pdf/facts/Grzimek.pdf). Named after Bernhard Grzimek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernhard_Grzimek), former director of the Frankfurt Zoo and a key player in the establishment of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, it is one of the world's most popular animal life encyclopedias. The latest volume Evolution was published in 2011 and edited with Val Geist and Eric Pianka (http://www.gale.cengage.com/servlet/ItemDetailServlet?region=9&imprint=000&titleCode=GALE&cf=p&type=3&id=259494). The series was named the American Library Association's Outstanding Reference Source for 2003.

Cover, Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Evolution, 2nd Edition

Cover, Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Evolution, 2nd Edition

The Walt Disney Company

Member, Disney's Animal Kingdom/Worldwide Conservation Fund Advisory Board

The Walt Disney Company
1995 – 2011 (16 years)Orlando, FL and Burbank, CA

Served on Disney's Animal Kingdom/Worldwide Conservation Fund Advisory Board. Along with other board members, which included experts such as Dr. Russell Mittermeier (President of Conservation International), William Conway (then Executive Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society), and Dr. Terry Maple (then Director of Zoo Atlanta), consulted with Disney staff on a wide variety of issues related to their animal programs. Interacted with top corporate executives, including CEOs Michael Eisner and Robert Iger. Worked extensively with Joe Rhode, Disney's Cheif Imagineer. The advisory board had a major impact on the directions of Disney's Animal Kingdom and Wildlife Conservation Fund projects, as well as other aspects of Disney operations (e.g., sustainable seafood initiative). The Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund now provides nearly $2 million annually to support conservation projects around the globe (http://thewaltdisneycompany.com/citizenship/environmental-stewardship/disney-worldwide-conservation-fund).

Disney's Animal Kingdom/Worldwide Conservation Fund Advisory Board after opening of the park in 1998.

Disney's Animal Kingdom/Worldwide Conservation Fund Advisory Board after opening of the park in 1998.

Grant Reviewer

Miscellaneous
1985 – 2011 (26 years)

In addition to grant reviews for the AZA Conservation Endowment Fund (CEF) and the Nixon Griffis Fund for Zoological Research, Dr. Hutchins has reviewed project grant and fellowship proposals for numerous organizations including the National Science Foundation, Earthwatch, Center for Field Studies, World Wildlife Fund's Kathryn Fuller Fellowship Program, Wildlife Conservation Society's International Training and Capacity Building Program and Disney's Worldwide Conservation Fund.

Global Traveler and Adventurer

Safari Professionals
1979 – 2011 (32 years)Miscelleaneous

Dr. Hutchins has traveled to over 30 counties and six continents pursuing his passion for wildlife science, management and conservation, including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Botswana, Brazil, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, England, France, Germany, Hong Kong (before its annexation by China), Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey (Channel Islands), Kenya, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Taiwan, Virgin Islands, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. He has flown to Australia 18 times and spent over a year of his life there, traveling to virtually every part of the continent with the exception of the northern Cape York Peninsula and the Kimberleys in Western Australia. Included among his many treasured experiences are: trapping and tagging mountain goats in the Olympic Mountains, SCUBA diving with Manta rays and sharks on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, tracking jaguars and anacondas in the Brazilian Pantanal, nearly stepping on a deadly fer-de-lance in Costa Rica, observing tribal ceremonies in Papua New Guinea, being within a few feet of wild lions in Tanzania, and snorkeling with marine iguanas and climbing Volcan Darwin in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. He is a former member of the Explorer's Club.

Co-organizer, Blue Ribbon Panel on the Future of the Wildlife Profession

The Wildlife Society
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)

Co-organized, co-moderated, and obtained funding for a meeting of experts to explore the future of the wildlife profession and its implications for training the next generation of wildlife professionals in Orlando, FL, November 8-10, 2010. The three-day meeting explored major environmental and societal trends expected to influence the wildlife profession over the coming decades, as well as current trends in university education, and used them to assess the future needs of the profession and formulate specific recommendations for academic institutions, hiring organizations and agencies and professional and scientific societies. Co-wrote and edited the 39-page summary report ( http://joomla.wildlife.org/documents/blue.ribbon.panel.final.report.pdf), which was widely distributed to stakeholders. The project was funded by the U.S. National Park Service, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, USDA National Institutes of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Geological Survey. Press release: http://www.enn.com/press_releases/3954.

Cover, Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Cover, Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Delaware Valley College

2010 Commencement Speaker

Delaware Valley College
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)

Gave the invited keynote address at the 2010 Commencement Ceremony at Delaware Valley College, PA. Spoke to a crowd of over 5,000 students, parents and faculty gathered for the event. Press coverage: http://voices.yahoo.com/celebrity-commencement-speaker-roster-2010-5988286.html.

M. Hutchins (left) at the 111th Commencement, Delaware Valley College, PA, May 15, 2010.

M. Hutchins (left) at the 111th Commencement, Delaware Valley College, PA, May 15, 2010.

Keynote Speaker, Human-Animal Bond Lecture Series

Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)Starkville, MS

Gave the invited keynote address titled "Adventures at the human wildlife interface" at the Wise Center Auditorium on the Mississippi State University campus on October 28, 2010. The lecture was presented as part of the College of Veterinary Medicine's Human-Animal Bond Lecture Series. Web advertisement: http://www.cvm.msstate.edu/hab.html.

Advertisement, Human-Animal Bond Lecture Series, Mississippi State University

Advertisement, Human-Animal Bond Lecture Series, Mississippi State University

Keynote Speaker, Grassland Initiative Workshop

Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)Colorado Springs, CO

Dr. Hutchins was the invited keynote speaker at the 2010 WAFWA Grassland Initiative Workshop: Methodologies for Estimating Prairie Dog Abundance, Fort Collins, CO, January 25, 2010. Dr. Hutchins' talk was titled: "The role science plays in management decisions, political arenas and public perception.”

The Wildlife Society

Organizer and Moderator, Feral Cats and Wildlife Conservation Meeting

The Wildlife Society
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)Arlington, VA

Organized and moderated a meeting titled "Feral Cats and Wildlife Conservation: Seeking a Solution" in collaboration with the American Bird Conservancy. The meeting, held on September 17, 2010 at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Migratory Bird Program's offices in Arlington, VA, attracted over 40 experts on wildlife conservation, wildlife health, and animal control to discuss the growing environmental problem of burgeoning feral domestic cat populations in the United States and elsewhere around the world. Participants, representing over 20 state and federal agencies, non-governmental conservation and wildlife rehabilitation organizations, professional/scientific societies, and universities, heard presentations on the impact of feral cats on native wildlife, the ineffectiveness of Trap-Neuter-Release management, and the diseases carried by feral cats and their impacts on both wildlife and human health. A group discussion explored possible solutions to the growing problem. Actions arising from the meeting, included a joint letter expressing concern to the Secretary of the Interior, development of a feral cat information package by TWS (http://joomla.wildlife.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=845&Itemid=183), and statements by TWS supporting the control of feral cats on federal lands (http://www.enn.com/press_releases/2582). TWS also published a special issue of its member magazine, The Wildlife Professional, on feral cats (http://www.issuu.com/the-wildlife-professional/docs/feralcats).

Briefing book cover, Meeting on Feral cats and Wildlife Conservation.

Briefing book cover, Meeting on Feral cats and Wildlife Conservation.

San Diego Zoo Global

Invited Speaker, Future of Zoos and Aquariums Conference

San Diego Zoo Global
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)San Diego, CA

Dr. Hutchins gave an invited presentation titled : "Animal rights and animal welfare" at the San Diego Zoological Society's Future of Zoos and Aquariums Conference in San Diego, CA on February 23, 2010.

Invited Panelist, 2010 Biennial National Meeting

Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Units Network
2010 – 2010 (less than a year)Washington, DC

Dr. Hutchins was invited to participate in a panel titled "Pathways to Success: Mobilizing the Next Generation of Natural Resource Professionals" at the 2010 Biennial Conference of the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network in Washington, DC on June 23, 2010,

University of Maryland, College Park

Adjunct Associate Professor, Graduate Program in Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development

University of Maryland, College Park
1994 – 2010 (16 years)College Park, MD

Lectured occasionally, assisted with problem solving courses, interacted with students. Served onMichael Kreger's doctoral committee for his study of whooping crane captive management and its possible influence on reintroduction success. Problem-solving projects Dr. Hutchins was involved in included: Giant panda loans to accredited zoos, evaluation of conservation project success, and solutions to the bushmeat crisis in Africa,

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Co-organizer, Planning for the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
2009 – 2009 (less than a year)Washington, DC

While at TWS. Dr. Hutchins was contracted by USGS along with representatives from the Ecological Society of America (ESA) and DC-based Meridian Institute to organize and conduct a series of four planning meetings across the United States to obtain expert input into the purposes and design of a National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center. Assisted in all aspects of the project, including moderating breakout sessions and writing and editing the final 39-page summary report on outreach and recommendations (https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/sites/default/files/documents/other/NPD%20Report%20FINAL.pdf ). Press release: http://www.enn.com/press_releases/3260.

Report cover, USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center

Report cover, USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center

The Wildlife Society

Co-organizer, USA NPN/TWS Wildlife Phenology Program

The Wildlife Society
2009 – 2009 (less than a year)Tuscon, AZ

Worked with USA-National Phenology Network (NPN, https://www.usanpn.org/) Executive Director Jake Weltzin to develop a cooperative citizen science-based program between USA-NPN and The Wildlife Society intended to track the effects of climate change on wildlife and complement USA-NPN's already existing program for plant phenology. The web-based program was successfully planned and launched with funding by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Related article: http://www.ecology.com/2009/03/11/wildlife-society-and-usa-national-phenology-network-announce-new-wildlife-phenology-program/. Press release: http://www.enn.com/press_releases/2739.

Georgia Institute of Technology

Senior Fellow, Center for Conservation and Behavior

Georgia Institute of Technology
2004 – 2009 (5 years)Atlanta, GA

Worked with Center Director, Dr. Terry Maple, on a number of research and publishing projects.

Member, Scientific Advisory Board

Hong Kong Society for Panda Conservation
2000 – 2009 (9 years)Hong Kong

Reviewed and helped to select research and conservation-related proposals for funding by the Hong Kong Society for Panda Conservation, a non-profit organization focused on the biology and conservation of the endangered giant panda in China (http://www.opcf.org.hk/pdf/annual-reports/hkspc/HKSPC_99.00.pdf).

Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Keynote Speaker, Northeast Ohio Biodiversity Alliance Awards Ceremony

Cleveland Museum of Natural History
2008 – 2008 (less than a year)Cleveland, OH

Dr. Hutchins was the invited keynote speaker at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History's Northeast Ohio Biodiversity Alliance Awards Ceremony on October 3, 2008. His presentation was titled: "The Wildlife Society: Adventures at the Human-Wildlife Interface." Press release: http://www.cmnh.org/site/AboutUs/PressRoom/2008/sep08neoaward.aspx.

The Wildlife Society

Member, Editorial Advisory Board, The Wildlife Professional

The Wildlife Society
2005 – 2008 (3 years)

Served on the Editorial Advisory Board and played a key role in the development of TWS' popular member magazine, The Wildlife Professional (TWP), which features articles on a broad range of subjects in wildlife science, management and conservation. Hired and worked closely with the first two TWP editors-in-chief to develop the magazine's policies, content and appearance. Using his extensive network in the conservation and government communities, Dr. Hutchins arranged to have former Secretary of the Interior, Bruce Babbitt, and former Speaker of the House, Newt Gingrich, write congratulatory letters to TWS for the launch of TWP, which were published in the inaugural issue. Dr. Hutchins raised over $100,000 to support the launch from accredited zoos and federal natural resource agencies, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, and USDA/APHIS Wildlife Services.

Cover, The Wildlife Professional published by The Wildlife Society

Cover, The Wildlife Professional published by The Wildlife Society

IUCN

Member, Captive Breeding Specialist Group

IUCN
1992 – 2008 (16 years)

Served as an active member of IUCN Species Survival Commission's Captive Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG, http://www.cbsg.org/). Attended and participated in conservation planning meetings for the Sumatran and Javan rhino, Sumatran tiger and Bali mynah in Indonesia and marsupials in Australia.

M. Hutchins at Ujung Kulon National Park, Java, Indonesia, 1992.

M. Hutchins at Ujung Kulon National Park, Java, Indonesia, 1992.

Annual Conference "Cutting Edge Speaker"

American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians
2007 – 2007 (less than a year)Knoxville, TN

Was the invited "Cutting Edge" Speaker at the 2007 Joint Annual Meeting of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians and American Association of Wildlife Veterinarian's in Knoxville, TN on October 24, 2007. The title of Dr. Hutchins' presentation was "Wildlife biologists and veterinarians: Need and mechanisms for improved collaboration."

Keynote Speaker

Wildlife Damage Management Conference
2007 – 2007 (less than a year)Corpus Cristi, TX

Dr. Hutchins was the invited keynote speaker for the 12th Annual Wildlife Damage Management Conference in Corpus Christi, TX on April 10, 2007. The title of his presentation was "Why wildlife populations must be controlled."

The Wildlife Society

Organizer and Facilitator, TWS Long-range Strategic Plan

The Wildlife Society
2005 – 2006 (1 year)While Oak Plantation, Yulee, FL

Organized and facilitated a long-range strategic planning process for The Wildlife Society (TWS), the premier professional and scientific association representing over 11,000 wildlife professionals. Arranged to have the initial planning meeting at the White Oak Planation in Yulee, FL, which was subsidized by the Howard Gilman Foundation. The initial meeting involved a diversity of people, representing a range of interests and backgrounds within the TWS membership. From this meeting, a draft plan was formulated covering all aspects of the organization's operations, including Administration and Finance, Public Education, Public Relations, Wildlife Conservation, Government Affairs, Publications and Membership. The draft plan went through an extensive review process by TWS chapters and the elected governing council before being finalized in 2006 (http://www.wildlife.org/who-we-are/strategic-plan). The plan guided the activities of TWS for more than five years (2006-2012), and a majority of the action items were implemented.

Chair, Steering Committee

Butterfly Conservation Initiative
2003 – 2005 (2 years)Silver Spring, MD

Led the formation and development of the Butterfly Conservation Initiative (http://butterflyrecovery.org/) from concept to over 50 supporting member organizations and one full time staff member. The mission of BFCI is to recover threatened and endangered butterflies in North America.

Cover of AZA Communique announcing the creation of BFCI.

Cover of AZA Communique announcing the creation of BFCI.

Member, IUDZG-The World Zoo Organization's Committee on Inter-regional Conservation Cooperation

IUDZG-The World Zoo Organization
2001 – 2005 (4 years)

Served as a founding member of IUDZG-The World Zoo Organization's (now the World Zoo Organization, WAZA, http://www.waza.org/en/site/home) Committee on Inter-regional Conservation Cooperation (CIRCC). The committee was composed of the conservation directors of the world's major regional zoo and aquarium associations and intended to facilitate and promote global cooperation. Traveled to international locations for meetings and helped to develop many foundational concepts for international cooperation, including the World Zoo Conservation Strategy. Attended IUDZG's Annual Conferences and contributed regional progress reports to the Conference Proceedings.

Cover, 1993 First Edition, World Zoo Conservation Strategy

Cover, 1993 First Edition, World Zoo Conservation Strategy

Chair and Co-chair of the Board

Bushmeat Crisis Task Force
1999 – 2005 (6 years)Silver Spring, MD

Served as Chair and Co-chair of the Board for the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force (BCTF), a multi-organizational consortium of major zoological institutions and conservation organizations formed to educate the news media and key decision makers in government about the growing illegal commercial trade in wildlife for meat in Africa (www,bushmeat.org). Organized and moderated the meeting that lead to the establishment of BCTF. Managed two fulltime staff and dozens of volunteers. Interviewed by the media on numerous occasions. Helped to organize and participated in Congressional briefings on Capitol Hill and at the National Press Club, which included well-known scientists such as Jane Goodall and Mike Fay and celebrities such as Jane Alexander and Stephanie Powers. Obtained a grant from World Wildlife Fund to support the development of bushmeat-related curriculum at the three African wildlife colleges. Press coverage: http://ens-newswire.com/ens/may2001/2001-05-22-06.asp.

M. Hutchins with H. Eves, actress Jane Alexander, and L. Bennett at National Press Club Event

M. Hutchins with H. Eves, actress Jane Alexander, and L. Bennett at National Press Club Event

IUCN

Member, Invasive Species Specialist Group

IUCN
1999 – 2005 (6 years)

Served as a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission's Invasive Species Specialist Group.

Series Editor, Book Series "Zoo and Aquarium Biology and Conservation"

Smithsonian Institution and Johns Hopkins University Press
1994 – 2005 (11 years)Washington, DC

Served as primary series editor. Produced six volumes: Ethics on the Ark: Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation (1995), Second Nature: Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals (1998), Great Apes and Humans: Ethics of Coexistence (2001), Komodo Monitors: Biology and Conservation (2002), Lion Tamarins: Biology and Conservation (2002), and Wildlife Contraception: Issues, Methods and Applications (2005). Also contributed chapters to several of the volumes. Co-authored a successful grant to the National Science Foundation's Ethics and Values Studies Unit to support the meeting that led to the initial book in the series, Ethics on the Ark.

Cover, Ethics of the Ark: Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation, 1995.

Cover, Ethics of the Ark: Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation, 1995.

Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Instructor, School for Professional Management and Development for Zoo and Aquairum Personnel

Association of Zoos and Aquariums
1992 – 2005 (13 years)Olgebay, WV

Dr. Hutchins served as an instructor at the North Carolina State University/AZA Schools for Professional Management Development for Zoo and Aquarium Personnel from 1992-2005, teaching courses on various aspects of AZA's extensive conservation and science programs. He received a Five Year Instructor Award in 1997 and a 10 Year Instructor Award in 2002.

Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Director/William Conway Chair, Department of Conservation and Science

Association of Zoos and Aquariums
1990 – 2005 (15 years)Bethesda, MD

Served as conservation and science department director and William Conway endowed chair for AZA, the world’s premier zoological association (then the American Zoo and Aquarium Association) representing over 200 accredited zoos and aquariums and over 6,000 professionals (http://www.aza.org/). The Association’s executive director and governing board charged Dr. Hutchins with all program and personnel matters, including strategic planning, budgeting, public relations, development of work plans, hiring and termination, and annual performance reviews. He coordinated a network of several hundred volunteer program coordinators and committee members for AZA’s extensive member-driven conservation and science programs, organized into 46 Taxon Advisory Groups, 110 Species Survival Plans, 13 Scientific Advisory Groups, 5 Fauna Interest Groups, and 300+ Studbooks/Population Management Plans. Served as the Society's primary media spokesperson, helping to develop press releases and doing dozens of radio, newspaper and magazine interviews. Heavily involved in policy-related activities, including reviewing all correspondence and analyses going to key decision makers in government, meetings with government officials, testimony to Congressional commitees, and facilitating cooperative MOUs with relevant natural resource agancies, including USFWS, USDA Forest Service, US National Park Service, and USDA APHIS. Major accomplishments included the development of the strategic collection planning concept, the AZA Annual Report on Conservation and Science, Taxon Advisory Groups, Fauna Interest Groups and Scientific Advisory Groups, and the establishment of the AZA Conservation Endowment Fund, Contraception Center and Small Population Management Center. Dr.Hutchins was also a strong proponent (along with Dr. William Conway of WCS) of increased support and involvement of AZA zoos and aquariums in in situ conservation.

M. Hutchins with John Cleese of Monty Python, Santa Barbara AZA Conference

M. Hutchins with John Cleese of Monty Python, Santa Barbara AZA Conference

Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Coordinator, AZA Conservation Endowment Fund/Ralston Purina Big Cat Survival Fund

Association of Zoos and Aquariums
1990 – 2005 (15 years)Bethesda and Silver Spring, MD

Developed policy and selection process for AZA's Conservation Endowment Fund (CEF) and Ralston Purina Big Cat Survival Fund. Moderated meetings of the selection committee. During Dr. Hutchins’ tenure, the CEF distributed over $2.8 million to support 177 projects in 36 countries worldwide. Dr.Hutchins assisted in CEF fund-raising, which included a $100,000 plus annual donation from the Walt Disney Company.

Member, Science Advisory Group

Smithsonian National Zoological Park
2003 – 2003 (less than a year)Froint Royal, VA

Served as member of the Smithsonian National Zoological Park's Science Advisory Group. Attended the organizational meeting at the Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, VA from 12-13 June, 2003. As a member of the group, provided input on the future of NZP's scientific programs and various relevant partnerships. This eventually led to a reorganization of NZP's scientific program and the establishment of a partnership with George Mason University to train future conservation professionals (http://eagle.gmu.edu/newsroom/715/).

The Ocean Project

Member, Steering Committee

The Ocean Project
1999 – 2003 (4 years)

Served on the Steering Committee of The Ocean Project, a zoo-, aquarium- and museum-led project with the goal of cultivating substantial change in the way that the public understands, relates to and uses the ocean. The Project's initial goals were to determine the public's current level of knowledge about oceans and the many problems facing marine aquatic habitats and organisms was through surveys and focus groups. This provided the foundation for an broader educational strategy. An overview of the project was provided by Bill Mott and Paul Boyle in a 2000 article titled "Aquariums, zoos and science museums to explore new ways to increase understanding of the oceans: A report on the Ocean Project and its recent national survey" in Endangered Species Update 17(3): 59-62.

Member, Graduate Training Committees

Various Universities
1985 – 2003 (18 years)Various

Advised post-graduate students pursuing Masters and Ph.D. degrees and served on the formal university graduate training committees of the following individuals:

•Ketchum, Mary. Activity patterns and enclosure utilization in the snow leopard, M.S. Thesis, University of Washington, Seattle, 1985

•Laska, Mark. Management and breeding of captive birds of paradise, M.S. Thesis, Fordham University, Bronx, NY, 1990.

•Kostel, Faith. Management and breeding of Asian batagur turtles at the New York Zoological Park, M.S. Thesis, Fordham University, Bronx, NY, 1990.

•Wildes, Michelle. The role of public aquaria in aquatic conservation and research, M.S. Thesis, Northestern University, Boston, MA, 2003. 

•Kreger, Michael. Behavioral profiles of captive juvenile whooping crane as an indicator of reproductive behavior and survival. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park, 2003.

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Member, Blue Ribbon Panel, Southern Sea Otter Conservation

Monterey Bay Aquarium
2002 – 2002 (less than a year)Monterey Bay, CA

Served as an invited member of the "Blue Ribbon Panel on Conservation Strategies for the Southern Sea Otter" convened by the Monterey Bay Aquarium on December 13-14, 2002. Panel members included experts in aquatic animal care and husbandry and conservation biology. The result of the meeting was a change in Aquarium policies towards sea otters, which emphasized conservation of the species as opposed to the rescue of individual animals: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-119626333.html.

Keynote Speaker, Animal Welfare Forum

American Veterinary Medical Association
2002 – 2002 (less than a year)Milwaukee, WI

Was the invited keynote speaker at the American Veterinary Medical Association's Animal Welfare Forum on October 11, 2002 in Milwaukee, WI. The title of Dr. Hutchins' presentation was "In defense of zoos and aquariums: An ethical basis for keeping wild animals in captivity." A written version of the paper, co-authored by M. Hutchins, B. Smith and R. Allard, was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 223: 958-966 in 2003.

AVMA Award Certificate

AVMA Award Certificate

Co-organizer and Moderator

Karner Blue Butterfly Recovery Implementation Workshop
May 2001 – June 2001 (2 months)Toledo, OH

Organized and moderated a Karner Blue Butterfly (KBB) Recovery Implementation Plan Workshop from 13-14 June 2001 in Toledo, OH in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Team and the state agencies responsible for on-the-ground implementation. The goals of the Workshop were to: (1) impart essential information on the KBB recovery implementation planning process to new and key players in the recovery effort; (2) to share current progress on KBB recovery on a state-by-state basis; (3) to introduce state and federal agency biologists to non-traditional partners, such as AZA zoos and aquariums, the National Wildlife Federation, Nature Conservancy and the Xerces Society; and (4) to reach consensus on a timeline for the completion of state recovery goals. The Workshop reached all of its stated goals, which were summarized in a brief report.

Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Co-Editor, AZA Field Conservation Resource Guide

Association of Zoos and Aquariums
2000 – 2001 (1 year)Bethesda, MD

Co-edited the AZA Field Conservation Resource Guide with then-Executive Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society, Dr. William Conway, Michael Souza and Yula Kapetanakos. Published and widely distributed in 2001, the Guide helped kick start the movement of AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums to greatly increase their contributions to in situ conservation, eventually resulting in a $130 million annual collective commitment. The 52-chapter volume written by over 80 contributors, covered the role of zoos and aquariums in research and conservation, education, professional training, ecotourism, and partnership-building, along with discussions of cultural issues, fund-raising and public relations. Dr.Hutchins was also a contributor, co-authoring the introduction, as well as articles about the AZA Conservation Endowment Fund and fund-raising and public relations.

Cover, AZA Field Conservation Resource Guide

Cover, AZA Field Conservation Resource Guide

Independent Consultant/Keiko-Free Willy Project

Ocean Futures
September 2000 – October 2000 (2 months)Westman Islands, Iceland

Invited by Ocean Futures to do an independent assessment of its Keiko/Free Willy Project, an attempt to reintroduce a long-captive killer whale made famous by the fictional movie "Free Willy" back into nature and to reintegrate him into a free-ranging killer whale pod. Dr. Hutchins spent a week in the Westman Islands, Iceland observing Keiko, the activities of the Ocean Futures' staff, and the reintroduction process. The conclusion of his detailed report was that Keiko was a poor candidate for release (due to his strong bond with humans) and that his observed behavior did not bode well for the reintroduction effort. The project was ultimately unsuccessful and Keiko eventually died after having crossed the North Sea on his own volition, never integrating into a free-ranging killer whale social group. Dr. Hutchins wrote an article on Keiko's death for the AZA Communique and was interviewed by numerous reporters regarding the project and its eventual outcome.

Keiko in training in Iceland for release attempt. Photo by M. Hutchins.

Keiko in training in Iceland for release attempt. Photo by M. Hutchins.

Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Organizer and Faciliator, AZA Elephant Planning Iniative

Association of Zoos and Aquariums
1999 – 1999 (less than a year)Bethesda, MD

Organized and facilitated a series of three two-day planning meetings involving nearly 50 experts on elephant captive management, field biology (including Dr. Ian Douglas Hamilton) and conservation, exhibit design, etc. to discuss the future of elephant management in accredited North American zoos. The final 84-page report, co-authored by Dr. Hutchins and Brandie Smith, laid out a series of options for consideration by the AZA Board of Directors and the directors of elephant holding institutions, ranging from enclosure size, to nutrition, to reproduction, to animal welfare and enrichment, to training methods to the zoo-circus relationship. The report provided an initial impetus for the many improvements that are currently underway in AZA institutions, including the development of the National Elephant Center and the move to protected contact management and larger enclosure sizes, just to name a few. This effort also provided the impetus for the Elephants and Ethics conference organized by Smithsonian's National Zoological Park. Dr. Hutchins served on the planning committee for this meeting, which included many of the world's experts on elephant biology, management and conservation, and resulted in the Johns Hopkins University Press book edited by Chris Wemmer and Catherine Christen: "Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence" published in 2008.

Cover, AZA Elephant Planning Initiative Report

Cover, AZA Elephant Planning Initiative Report

Member, Executive Commitee

Black-footed Ferret Recovery Team
1996 – 1996 (less than a year)

Served as a member of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Black-footed Ferret Recovery Team's Executive Committee.

Organizer and Facilitator

Micronesian Kingfisher Species Survival Plan Action Plan
May 1995 – February 1996 (10 months)Bethesda, MD

Organized and moderated an action planning meeting from 12-13 May, 1995 covering all aspects of the AZA's Micronesian (Guam) Kingfisher SSP. Participants included experts from the zoo community, non-governmental conservation organizations, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Guam Department of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources. This endangered bird was completely extirpated from its natural habitat following the accidental introduction of the brown tree snake, a native of Australia and New Guinea. The species only existed in captivity, so it was considered essential that the protocols for husbandry and breeding be immediately improved. The resulting plan, co-authored by Dr. Hutchins and SSP Coordinator Beth Bahner, and reviewed and approved by meeting participants, summarized numerous concrete recommendations, which provided the basis for the SSP's and recovery plan's activities during the next half-decade. The project was funded by grants from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Environmental Defense Fund and American Bird Conservancy.

Cover, Micronesian Kingfisher SSP Action Plan

Cover, Micronesian Kingfisher SSP Action Plan

Organizer and Facilitator

Black-footed Ferret Recovery Analysis and Action Plan
1995 – 1995 (less than a year)Denver, CO

Organized and moderated a series of three meetings in Denver, CO at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to analyze and make recommendations for the future of black-footed ferret (BFF) recovery. At the time, the BFF was still one of the most endangered mammals in North America. The meetings included all the key players in ferret recovery, as well as additional experts having experience with the reintroduction of other species. A detailed plan was formulated and reviewed by the participants, and, once finalized, provided the basis for ferret recovery for the next half-decade or more. Most, if not all, of the recommended actions were eventually implemented, including the development of a plague vaccine for ferrets and the addition of new release sites. There are now more ferrets living in nature than in captivity. The project was funded by grants from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

Cover, Black-footed Ferret Recovery Program Analysis and Action Plan, 1996

Cover, Black-footed Ferret Recovery Program Analysis and Action Plan, 1996

Senior Staff Advisor

AZA Giant Panda Conservation Action Plan
1992 – 1995 (3 years)Washington, DC

Participated in meetings with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and World Wildlife Fund to try to find a solution to China's highly controversial short-term loans of giant pandas to accredited U.S. zoos. The eventual result was the development of the AZA Giant Panda Conservation Action Plan and Giant Panda SSP, which facilitated the current system of long-term loans of giant pandas to accredited zoos, and with millions of dollars going to support specific in situ conservation and related scientific and educational projects in China. Dr. Hutchins also participated in initial negotiations with representatives from the Chinese ministries of Forestry and Construction, which were responsible for the disposition of giant pandas in Chinese forest reserves and zoos, respectively and was interviewed by the media concerning the details and implications of the plan.

Giant pandas

Giant pandas

Team Leader/Techical Direction Agent, U.S. Navy Panel on Marine Mammal Reintroduction

U.S. Navy
1992 – 1992 (less than a year)

Participated in committee meetings and independently reviewed the findings of this national planning effort that was mandated by Congress to explore the possibility of reintroducing dolphins owned and managed by the U.S. Navy back into nature.

Co-Organizer and Instructor

Applying Behavioral Research to Zoo Animal Management Workshop
1986 – 1992 (6 years)

Co-organized and served as instructor (with Drs. C. Crockett, J. Mellen and E. Stevens) for the Applying Behavioral Research to Zoo Animal Management Workshop. Directed specifically at curatorial, veterinary and keeper staff, this eight-day long workshop explored the important link between behavioral research and zoo animal management. The course was conducted from July 19-26, 1986, and July 18-25, 1987 at the Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle, from May 7-14, 1988 and April 29-May 6, 1989 at the Dallas Zoo, from June 2-9, 1990 at Zoo Atlanta and from 2-10 November, 1992 at the Taipei Zoo, Taiwan. Co-authored an article on the workshop for the AZA Annual Conference Proceedings.

Cover of Applied Behavioral Research book.

Cover of Applied Behavioral Research book.

Curatorial Intern in Mammalogy, Conservation Biologist and Coordinator of Research

New York Zoogical Society, Bronx Zoo
1985 – 1990 (5 years)Bronx, New York

As a curatorial intern in the Department of Mammology, Dr. Hutchins went on daily rounds with veterinarians and captured and restrained a wide variety of animals for treatment or examination, designed exhibits, wrote educational graphics, participated in weekly animal management meetings, helped to manage and train keeper staff and manage the entire mammal collection, including the pair of young giant pandas, which were sent by China on loan in 1988. As Conservation Biologist, Dr. Hutchinsdeveloped a coordinated research program at the Bronx Zoo, including the development of protocols for working with local universities, processing biological materials requests, and adhering to USDA APHIS rules regarding animal welfare. Many seminal papers on zoo research program design were published and served as a model for other AZA institutions. As Coordinator of Research, Dr. Hutchins organized and coordinated research activities on the animal collection, working with curators, keepers, and graduate students and professors from local universities (primarily Fordham University, which was right next door). Served as member of the Editorial Advisory Board for Animal Kingdom Magazine, member of the Advisory Board of the Nixon Griffis Fund for Zoological Research, and as an officer of the Zoological Research Committee. Named an NYZS Conservation Fellow and Field Associate in 1990.

Cover, NYZS Research Manual written by M. Hutchins

Cover, NYZS Research Manual written by M. Hutchins

Tour Leader and Field Assistant, Megellanic Penguin Study, Patagonia, Argentina

The Wildlife Conservation Society
1988 – 1988 (less than a year)Punta Tombo, Patagonia, Argentina

Spent a few weeks taking a small group of adventure travelers to Punta Tombo, Patagonia, Argentina to assist University of Washington Professor Dr. Dee Boersma in her long-term study of the biology and ecology of Megellanic penguins. Camped near the coastal penguin colony, which consisted of an estimated 500,000 pairs of birds. Helped to capture, tag and take physiometric mesurements of nearly 2,000 penguins. Also observed and photographed many other animals in the region, including guanaco, red-faced cormorants, Southern fur seals, elephant seals, Darwin's rhea, tinamou, and others.

M. Hutchins weighing a Megellanic penquin, Patagonia, Argentina, 1988

M. Hutchins weighing a Megellanic penquin, Patagonia, Argentina, 1988

Consultant

Australian Tourist Commission
1985 – 1986 (1 year)Australia

Assisted in a project designed to promote Australian natural history in North America. Traveled extensively for six consecutive months in Australia at Australian Tourist Commission expense, focusing primarily on national parks, wildlife areas, and zoological parks. Wrote several popular articles on Australian fauna and habitats for North American, Australian, and Japanese publications, including Animal Kingdom, Islands Magazine, The Living Bird, Australian Geographic, Anima, and Animals. Information collected also became the basis for Gerry Ellis , Sharon Cohen , and Mark Kestigian's Outdoor Traveler's Guide to Australia.

Aboriginal rock art, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territories, Australia.

Aboriginal rock art, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territories, Australia.

University of Washington

Acting Assistant Professor and Graduate Instructor

University of Washington
1978 – 1985 (7 years)

Developed curriculum for and taught five different undergraduate and graduate-level courses, including Animal Behavior, Animal Behavior Laboratory, Behavioral Studies of Zoo Animals, Psychology as a Natural Science and Behavioral Ecology. Managed graduate assistants and lecture note takers. Dr.Hutchins' introductory animal behavior course, taken as a natural science distribution credit, regularly had over 800 students and was taught in a large auditorium in Kane Hall on the UW campus. Behavioral Ecology, a graduate level course, was taught when Dr. Hutchins was a graduate student. Behavioral Studies of Zoo Animals was taught at Seattle's Woodland Park Zoological Gardens and was one of the first university courses to use zoos as a laboratory to instruct students in animal behavior research methodology.

Kane Hall (left) and Suzzalo Library on UW campus, Seattle, WA

Kane Hall (left) and Suzzalo Library on UW campus, Seattle, WA

Research Associate

Woodland Park Zoological Gardens
1975 – 1985 (10 years)Seattle, WA

Published accounts of research projects conducted at the Zoo in peer-reviewed journals. Worked in collaboration with zoo administrators, curators and keepers to ensure that the studies' results were applied to practical problems in wildlife breeding, husbandry and management. Helped to develop and conduct a workshop titled "Applying Behavioral Research to Zoo Animal Management" which was subsequently taught at several other institutions including Zoo Atlanta, Dallas Zoo and Taipei Zoo in Taiwan.

University of Washington

Graduate Staff Associate, Center for Instructional Development

University of Washington
1981 – 1982 (1 year)Seattle, WA

Assisted with the development and presentation of seminars, workshops, and courses intended to improve the quality of instruction by UW faculty and graduate students. Taught a microteaching course that utilized video taping and constructive criticism to improve the lecture presentation styles of both faculty and graduate students.

Team Leader, Field Study on the Social Biology of Rocky Mountain Goats in Olympic National Park, WA

University of Washington
1978 – 1981 (3 years)Olympic National Park, Washington

Conducted a four-year field study of the social biology of an introduced population of Rocky Mountain goats in Olympic National Park, Washington. Worked in cooperation with the U.S. National Park Service and supervised seven field assistants during the course of the study, most of whom went on to obtain graduate degrees or work in the wildlife or other natural resource fields. Assisted with the capture, measurement and tagging of over 300 animals and the capture, processing and removal of 100 more in 1981 to be transferred to the North Cascades. The work became the topic of Dr. Hutchins' doctoral dissertation: Hutchins, M. 1984. The Mother-Offspring Relationship in Mountain Goats (Oreamnos americanus), 351 pp. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B. Sci. Eng. 45(11): 3443) and was highlighted in a feature article co-authored by Dr. Hutchins and Dr. Victoria Stevens in Natural History magazine in 1981.

Natural History article on Olympic Mountain Goats by M. Hutchins and V, Stevens, 1981

Natural History article on Olympic Mountain Goats by M. Hutchins and V, Stevens, 1981

Field Assistant, Study on the Ecology of Feral Domestic Cats in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

University of Florida
1979 – 1979 (less than a year)Isabella Island, Galapagoes Islands, Ecuador

Assisted in the fieldwork of University of Florida graduate student Michael Konecny who was studying the ecology of feral domestic cats in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Helped conduct a field survey of Volcan Darwin, a 3-day trip on foot where four team members carried 7.5 gallons of water. Captured feral cats for examination. Also able to explore other islands, including Fernandina and Santa Cruz.

M. Hutchins with Galapagos sea lion on Isabella Island, 1979

M. Hutchins with Galapagos sea lion on Isabella Island, 1979

Tennis Instructor and Pro-shop Manager

Pagosa Springs Resort
1970 – 1973 (3 years)Pagaosa Springs, CO

Served as tennis instructor and pro shop manager at Seattle, WA, Pagosa Springs, CO and Spokane, WA from 1970-1073. Was half of the number one-ranked high school doubles team in the state of Washington in 1969 (with Loren McPhillips) and was undefeated during the regular season. Played in numerous tournaments. Had the privilege of meeting and interacting with many of the world's best known tennis professionals, including Poncho Gonzales, Arthur Ashe, Charlie Pasarell, Rod Laver and Althea Gibson.

M. Hutchins with Arthur Ashe, Pagosa Springs, CO, 1972

M. Hutchins with Arthur Ashe, Pagosa Springs, CO, 1972

Publications

Hutchins, M., Geist, V., and Pianka, E. (eds.) 2011 Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Evolution, 2nd Edition. Farmington, MI: Gale.

Beck, B., Stoninski, T., Hutchins, M., Maple, T., et al. (eds.) 2001. Great Apes and Humans: Ethics of Coexistence. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Instritution Press.

Shepherdson, D., Mellen, J. and Hutchins, M. (eds.). 1998. Second Nature: Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Norton, B., Hutchins, M., Stevens, E., and Maple, T. (eds.). 1995. Ethics on the Ark: Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Bies, L., Hutchins, Organ, J., and DeMaris, S. 2012. The role of professional societies in integrating science and management. Pp. 85-98 in Sands, et al. (eds.) Wildlife Science: Connecting Research with Management. New York: Taylor & Francis.

Hutchins, M. 2010. The dilemma of confiscated wildlife. Pp. 196-202 in Fern, E. and Redford, K. (eds.) State of Wildlife 2010. New York: Wildlife Conservation Society.

Burghhardt, G., Murphy, J., Chizar, D., and Hutchins, M. 2008. Combating ophiophobia: Origins, treatment, education, and conservation. Pp. 262-280 in Mullin, S. and Seigel, R.A. (eds.) Snakes: Applied Ecology and Conservation. Ithaca, NY: Cornell.

Hutchins, M., and Thompson, S. 2008. Zoo research: Priority setting for the coming decades. Zoo Biology 27: 488-497.

Hutchins, M., Smith, B., and Keele, M. 2008. Zoos as responsible stewards of elephants. Pp. 285-305 in Wemmer, C. and Christen, K. (eds.). Never Forgetting: Elephants, Ecology and Ethics. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins.

Eves, H., Hutchins, M., and Bailey, N. 2007. Bushmeat Crisis Task Force. Pp. 327-344 in Stoinski, T. et al. (eds.) Conservation in the 21st Century: Gorillas as a Case Study. New York: Springer.

Hutchins, M. 2007. The animal rights-conservation debate: Can zoos and aquariums play a role? Pp. 92-109 in Zimmerman, A., et al. (eds.) Zoos in the 21st Century: Catalysts for Conservation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Hutchins, M. 2006. Death at the zoo: The media, science and reality. Zoo Biology 25: 101-115.

Hutchins, M. and Kreger, M. 2006. Rhinoceros Behaviour: Implications for captive management and conservation. International Zoo Yearbook 40: 150-173.

Hutchins, M. 2006. Variation in nature and its implications for zoo elephant management. Zoo Biology 25: 161-171.

Hutchins, M. and Keele, M. 2001. Elephant importation from range countries: Ethical and practical considerations for accredited zoos. Zoo Biology 25: 219-233.

Hutchins, M. 2003. Zoo and aquarium animal management and conservation: Current trends and future challenges. International Zoo Yearbook 38: 14-28.

Hutchins, M. and Smith, B. 2004. Characteristics of a world class zoo or aquarium in the twenty-first century. International Zoo Yearbook 38: 14-28.

Hutchins, M., Smith, B., and Allard, R. 2003. In defense of zoos and aquariums: The ethical basis for keeping wild animals in captivity. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 223: 958-966.

Ciofi, C., Hutchins, M., and Smith B. 2002. In situ and ex situ conservation. Pp. 211-230 in Murphy, J. et al. (eds.) Komodo Dragons: Biology and Conservation. Washington, DC: Smithsonian.

Hutchins, M. and Smith, B. 2000. The value of captive breeding programs to field conservation: Elephants as an example. Pachyderm 28: 101-109.

Hutchins, M., Thomas, and Asa, C. 1996. Pregnancy and parturition in captive animals. Pp. 468-496 in Kleiman, D., Lumpkin, S., and Allen, M. (eds.). Wild Mammals in Captivity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hutchins, M. and Conway, W. 1995. Beyond Noah's Ark: The evolving role of modern zoological parks and aquariums in field conservation. International Zoo Yearbook 34: 84-97.

Hutchins, M. 1995. The Olympic mountain goat controversy continues. Conservation Biology 9: 1-3.

Hutchins, M. et al. 1995. Behavioral considerations in the captive management, propagation and reintroduction of endangered birds. Pp. 263-289 in Gibbons, E. et al. (eds.) Captive Conservation of Endangered Species. Albany: SUNY Press.

Hutchins, M., Wiese, R., and Willis, K. 1995. Strategic collection planning: Theory and practice. Zoo Biology 14: 5-25.

Laska, M., Burger, D., Hutchins, M. et al. 1994. Social interactions and display behavior in captive lesser birds of paradise. Bird Behaviour 10: 1-6.

Laska, M., Hutchins, M. et al. 1992. Successful reproduction by unplumed male lesser birds of paradaise: Evidence for an alterative mating strategy? Emu 92: 108-111.

Hutchins, M., Smith, G., Mead, D., Elbin, S. and Steenberg, J. 1991. Socal behavior in Matschie's tree kangaroos and its implications for captive management. Zoo Biology 10: 147-164.

Hudgen, K. Hutchins, M., Sheppard, C., Bruning, D., and Worth, W. 1991. Breeding and management of the red bird of paradise at the New York Zoological Park. International Zoo Yearbook 30: 192-199.

Hutchins, M., Foose, T. and Seal, U. 1991. The role of veterinary medicine in endangered species conservation. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 23: 277-281.

Hutchins, M., et al. 1991. Hand-rearing, growth and development of the red bird of paradise at the New York Zoological Park. Zoo Biology 10: 17-33.

Hutchins, M. 1990. Serving science and conservation: The biological materials request protocol of the New York Zoological Society. Zoo Biology 9: 447-460.

Hutchins, M. 1988. On the design of zoo research programmes. International Zoo Yearbook 27: 9-19.

Horning, C., Hutchins, M., and English, W. 1990. Management and breeding of common trumpeters. Zoo Biology 7: 193-210.

Hutchins, M. 1987. Management and breeding of Rocky Mountain goats at Woodland Park Zoo. International Zoo Yearbook 26: 297-308.

Hutchins, M., and Geist, V. 1987. Behavioral considerations in the management of mountain dwelling ungulates. Mountain Research and Development 7: 135-144.

Hutchins, M. Stevens, V., and Atkins, N. 1982. Introduced species and the issue of animal welfare. International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems 3: 318-336.

Hutchins, M. and Barash, D.P. 1978. Grooming in primates: Implications for its utilitarian function. Primates 17: 45-50.

Hutchins, M. 1976. Breeding biology and behaviour of the Indian pied hornbill. International Zoo Yearbook 16: 99-101.

Hutchins, M., Wiese, R. and Bowdoin, J. 1996. Black-footed Ferret Recovery Program Analysis and Action Plan. Bethesda, MD: American Zoo and Aquarium Association.

Hutchins, M. 2012. What the future holds: Challenges for the profession and TWS. The Wildlife Professional 6: 83-87.

Baydack, R. and Hutchins, M. 2012. Fueling the next generation: Seventy-five years of nurturing students. The Wildlife Professional 6: 54-59.

Krausman, P. and Hutchins, M. 2011. The Wildlife Society Bulletin: A key component of wildlife literature. Wildlife Society Bulletin 35: 341.

Hutchins, M. 2011. Climate change and wildlife: How is TWS helping to address the coming challenge? The Wildlife Professional 5: 50-51.

Inkly, D. and Hutchins, M. 2008. The leadership demands of climate change: If not us, who? If not now, when? The Wildlife Professional 2: 9.

Hutchins, M. 2008. The nasty necessity: How to control wildlife populations. InFormation Fall: 34-38.

Hutchins, M. 2008. Why we must control wildlife populations. InFormation Spring: 29-33.

Hutchins, M. 2008. To cull or not to cull? That is the question as South Africa lifts its ban on elephant culling. The Wildlife Professional 2: 11-13.

Hutchins, M. 2007. The limits of compassion. The Wildlife Professional 1: 42-46.

Hutchins, M. and Stevens, V. 1981. The Olympic mountain goats. Natural History 90: 59-69.

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